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Ever Decreasing Circles part three

User
Posted 21 Jan 2015 at 13:35

Thanks Ray

User
Posted 21 Jan 2015 at 18:13

Glad it's going well for you Paul. Long may it continue

Best Wishes Sandra

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 25 Feb 2015 at 20:25

I was looking at a medscape summary of a discussion which shows that:

"Men with a history of testicular cancer not only have a greater risk of developing prostate cancer, the disease is more likely to be of intermediate to high risk when it does develop, a registry analysis shows.

The study was presented during a press conference ahead of the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium (GUCS) 2015, in Orlando, Florida.

"Further validation studies are needed to confirm these findings based on other cohorts to determine if men with testicular cancer should have closer [than usual] screening for prostate cancer," Mohummad Minhaj SIddiqui, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, told the press conference.

"But based on these findings, we believe that men with a history of testicular cancer should consider a discussion regarding the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening with their physician," he added."

It can be found here: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/840285?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=201270MR

Although too late for me it is interesting that I had testicular Cancer in 1982 and now have PCa with bone mets yet no medic had any discussion with me about PCa. Sometimes prevention can be deceptively easy but often medical discovery focuses on high end high cost treatments and the simple stuff gets ignored. I get that this research is recent but surely given the proximity of the two cancers I might have at least been given intelligence about PSA etc. C'est la vie I guess.

Edited by member 25 Feb 2015 at 20:26  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Feb 2015 at 21:34
Paul

I am so sorry that , in line with your own medical history, this research has potentially shown something which I suspect you have always considered a probability. I know you are a wonderful person who never seems to have any bitternees or angst about the things that have happened in your life. Indeed on finding this the first thing you do is share it so anyone who knows anyone that has had testicular cancer can also make them aware.

I rather think that there will be more and more evidence of other genetic or chemical links from one cancer to another and more manifestations of a new primary cancer being related but not the same as the first. Although that is a bit frightening it could also be seen as a warning sign for prevention as you so rightly point out.

I know you will pass this off as "there but for" but I still want to say that I feel for you right now my friend.

xx

Mo

User
Posted 25 Feb 2015 at 21:48

Both interesting posts...is there some genetic link or are some people unlucky or a mixture of both...

I'm still a little concerned that my GP is sending me for an endoscopy with the words "I don't think it will be stomach cancer" ringing in my ears....is he aware of possible links. ...unlikely but hey ho...

Thanks for sharing Paul

Bri

User
Posted 25 Feb 2015 at 22:42

Paul, I think that a link between the two seems likely now but how direct might that be? Certainly, our understanding of hormonal cancers has come on significantly in 32 years and what is known now could not have been imagined then (I just had that conversation with my children this evening about FaceTime - when I was young, tv portrayals of people using hand held communications where you could see the caller's face were reserved for Doctor Who or sci-fi films).

It strikes me that a man treated for testicular cancer must have a more consistent testosterone level due to medication than others whose T rises with maturity and then drops with age - could this increase the aggressiveness of what would otherwise be a pussy cat? In my mind, yes this must be a possibility. My guess is that if a young man is offered testosterone to enable him to be 'normal' but with the warning that this may increase his risk of another cancer many years in the future, that young man may conclude it is a risk worth taking. You came to supplementary T late on and maybe would have taken a different view if you had known.

Edited by member 26 Feb 2015 at 00:37  | Reason: Not specified

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 26 Feb 2015 at 10:03

Thanks Mo appreciate your thoughts. I am as you suggest not fazed by this. I can see no useful purpose in imagining What if in my own circumstances. I am where I am and need to focus on that rather than thinking back to what might have been.

Lyn, it's interesting that the first conversation I had about testosterone was in 2011, just 29 years after my right orchidectomy. Even though I had conversations about ED for about ten years testosterone never featured in the conversation until I got a referral to my diabetes consultant. So I certainly wasn't,t offered any supplemental treatment and thus I probably had a low testosterone level for many years, contributing to ED and loss of libido but maybe also impacting positively on the cancer in the prostate. I do think that my reactions to HT have been manageable in ways it does not seem to happen for many others as I have not felt an extreme change as a result of complete testosterone blockage even with casodex over the past few weeks. My T level was about 3 when tested in mid 2011 so was already very low and although causing me problems was maybe a protective factor too.

I remember being discharged after ten years from my testicular cancer oversight, so around 1992/3, and at that time I think testicle removal was probably a key treatment for Prostate cancer but there was no pep talk about testosterone, PCa or anything else. In fact I was told only one thing that my chances of getting Cancer again was no greater or no less than anyone else!

User
Posted 26 Feb 2015 at 22:13

Really interesting post Paul, how many times do we hear that some  who has been cured of cancer many years ago and then it pops up some where else. The old adage that lightening doesn't strike twice certainly seems to be inaccurate where cancer is concerned. I firmly believe that hormones have a much bigger part to play in lots of different types of cancer, who knows maybe all cancers.

I have just read an interesting article on neutering male and female dogs at an early age. (I was researching this for a totally different reason) and one of the findings was that early removal of either testes or fallopian tubes and there by stopping production of Testosterone and Estrogene had a detrimental affect on bone growth platletes .  Here is the interesting bit , I would have assumed that by stopping the relevant hormones the bone growth would also stop but this was found not to be the case and these hormones in fact play a very important part in telling the body to stop growing after puberty. The outcome was that early neutering (reducing hormone levels to early ) results in bone growth growing out of control and multiplying without a stop sign and that is exactly what cancer does. There was also a higher incidence in later life  of cancers in dogs that had been neutered before they had reached sexual maturity.

So I know this is a bit out there but when you think that when boys are born there testicles are swollen due to an influx of female hormones from mum and girls are born with there ovary's complete with all of there eggs and we are all only here for one thing to reproduce then hormones are so important and yet so fragile. How easily that can upset the balance of our bodies.

Wow I said all of that without a smiley face.

BFN

Julie X

 

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 13:05

Interesting stuff Julie!

On another note I have succumbed to my first UTI for nearly six months which is a bit disappointing. I have been taking a prophylactic dose of an anti biotic which has been keeping the UTIs at bay. On Thursday of last week I noticed my urine was a little cloudy and thought a UTI was on its way. For the next two days it seems to have battled with the anti biotics in my body and it stayed peripheral. My dip stick test revealed no nitrates. Suddenly in the night on Saturday the infection won this little battle with a vengeance. Painfully I was up at 2 am with pain and the urge to pee and a very poorly looking urine colour and plenty of nitrates. I started medicating immediately and painkillers and continued yesterday and it has beaten it back somewhat but I shall continue for a few days before reverting to the prophylactic dose.

On Friday I had my blood test for my check up next Monday. I do hope this incipient infection will not have distorted the results. At least the timing of the consultation means we can discuss the re-emergence of the UTI and discuss next steps. I still self catherise so I am not entirely surprised that after such a good run it has returned. However my general level of tiredness which was increasing has if anything got less in the last few months and I was now thinking that the UTI was a major contributor to my feelings of tiredness not just the HT. I have a busy week this week so hope I can maintain the energy levels.

User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 13:22
Paul

I am really sorry you have had/got another UTI. You must be quite fed up having thought you had got to the root of the problem and managing it so well for 6 months or so. Sounds like you have this one under control.

As to your test results I do not think it would skew the PSA/ALP figures in themself but you will possibly get some marginally errant readings in what I call the Ium values, potassium, calcium etc. Maybe CRP/ESR if they measure those for inflammation and raised protein levels.

I think the angst all you Men on here go through pre test and during the time that you wait for those results has an impact on your general well being.

I will be thinking of you as I always do and hoping that you get everything back to your version of normal asap.

xx

Mo

User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 17:58

Hi Paul

Sorry to hear the UTI has made a reappearance.
I know how important your work is to you so I am really hoping your energy levels are such that you can cope with your really busy week.

I thought I had read that a UTI can potentially skew the PSA results. So just checked out the Patient.Co. uk website that suggests the patient should not have an active UTI amongst other factors when having the PSA test. I know Google isn't always reliable but the above is a proven website that student nurses and other health practitioners are guided to.

I hope the consultation goes well on Monday

Bri

User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 18:57
Paul

Bri is right a UTI can cause a slightly elevated PSA, The amount would be significant for anyone in the "Cure" camp but for someone with advanced disease ( and I was assured of this by Mick's medics) it not likely to be that significant.

I guess it is my bad for making a rather generic statement.

If you are at all concerned about the UTI having an impact but if you do not want to delay your routine consult, then maybe you could mention this and ask if you could have a PSA retest once you are clear of infection again. With the number and frequency of UTIs you have had since diagnosis I would think this has probably coincided with a PSA test before.

Sorry if I got this wrong but I was just trying to cause you a bit less angst when I know you are even busier than normal and dealing with other issues as well.

xx

Mo

User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 19:35

Sorry that you are having these issues Paul,

I hope you manage to clear it up and carry on as near normal as possible.

atb

dave

User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 22:00

Thanks for all the good wishes. I know it will recede but will be interesting to see if my uro, a new one, maintains the prophylactic dose.

I have been told in the past that PSA can be affected by an infection and by anti biotics but I was only taking the prophylactic dose on Friday when I had the blood test so I am hoping the impact will not be great.

User
Posted 02 Mar 2015 at 22:16

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I have been told in the past that PSA can be affected by an infection 

I have been told that as well Paul.  Hope it all works out.

dave

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 03:04
Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I have been told in the past that PSA can be affected by an infection and by anti biotics but I was only taking the prophylactic dose on Friday when I had the blood test so I am hoping the impact will not be great.

Paul, I guess in this circumstance if there was a rise you would not know if it was the infection or the prophylactic dose of anti biotics or a combination of factors that caused it. In my (not necessarily logical) thinking if there is a rise that concerns you only a retest on no anti biotics and clear of infection would give you a truer figure and even then that could only be used as a comparison against the last known unaffected test result.

I am so sorry I have been rubbish at putting over what I thought in your personal circumstances was a valid observation.

All the very best for your consult I will be thinking of you as always

xx

Mo

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 08:04

At the end of the day the consultant will know what to do. As always we can only share our opinions on here as that is all they are

Hope all goes well Paul

Bri

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 13:23

Thanks guys I do appreciate your input and I'll let you know the outcome soon!

I wanted to say something about tests which expresses a different position than expressed by a lot of men on here. It may be helpful for some. I make a complete disconnect between the blood test itself and the results. I do not feel any anxiety about the next results until the day of the appointment and indeed usually when I am in the waiting room my mind begins to ask the What if questions. I have been thinking about this and whether I could articulate why this is so for me in the hope it may help those whose anxiety appears to be extremely high prior to their results.

Firstly for me I am not sure I want my PSA in isolation. What do I do with the info until I can discuss and share it with my consultant. I can speculate and if I come on here we can all speculate but this would create rather than reduce anxiety. So I see the test as no more anxiety provoking than making an appointment.

Secondly, I have to keep living my life and stay focussed on that and I try and limit speculation and my future to my consultation. I do think about it but it's not my waking thought, my life and what I need to do today is much more upfront.

Thirdly I learnt a technique when I was a young probation officer which enables me to create some distance and perspective. I did this because as a 25 year old entering such a challenging job I was taking it home with me, worrying through the evening and night and rushing to work to check some disaster had not occurred. I realised that I could not function in this way and with my supervisor I learnt to put it to one side until I could next do anything about it. So I worried whilst with a client and by the time I was home I had parked it. (I think that was one reason I got into soaps as I found them relaxing, easing the day away, music or a bath or even a drink might do that for others) and this was reaffirmed many years later when I became a single parent and was multi tasking frantically. I had so many pressures on me I needed to find a bubble which was just me and shut the world out for a while.

I know we are all different and I can fully understand the sense of anxiety which precedes a new consultation and I do feel it acutely on the day. But I also get some distance from it if I can.

Hope these thoughts might hit a button for some of you out there.

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 14:19

So that is why you manage to appear so calm Paul, not so sure about the soaps though, I haven't seen Coronation Street since Ena Sharples days! Sorry about your latest problems though, and, yes hormones are to blame for many of us, which is why Prof J P and Prof T recommend cutting down or eliminating dairy, although we still need some for the Calcium.


Thanks for your postings.

Chris.

PS. all the best for your next Medic visits.

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 15:22

I was going to give blood for my PSA test before we came away, in fact I've had two lots of blood taken a week ago and on both occasions the GP first and then the nurse asked if I wanted the PSA adding. I refused.

The reason was two fold. I usually have the PSA tested at Sheffield but more importantly I knew I wouldn't be able to wait for my results until my appt on the 24th. I've not really given them a 2nd thought...but I know I will get nervous as I wait to see the oncologist on the 24th. So I do fully understand your point of view Paul. You will have seen my recent photos that show a man who isn't worrying at the moment. However, if my PSA is ok it will feel like I have got another 6 months of life.

By the way my other bloods were all normal apart from glucose being borderline at 6.3..but I hadn't fasted for that

Bri

Edited by member 03 Mar 2015 at 15:23  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 15:49
Bri, WOW

that is amazing I never thought you would be thinking and talking like this having seen your posts a year or so ago. You sound so full of laid backness, indeed I would say you might even be positively prone (on a sandy beach somewhere with a San Mig or similar in hand) Good for you

xx

Mo

User
Posted 03 Mar 2015 at 16:04
Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

However, if my PSA is ok it will feel like I have got another 6 months of life.

Bri

Bri, what a lovely quote. Actually in terms of PCa you will have far more than six months even with a bad result. But I do not want to remove the increasingly drunken looking smile on Facebook it's your birthday, enjoy without reservation.

User
Posted 04 Mar 2015 at 00:34

Lovely post Paul on how you deal with PSA angst , I think this is really helpful for newly diagnosed although we all different and how we deal with life in general is so very different. There was an old guy on this forum that used to say Life is for Living http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-wink.gif how very true.  That still leaves the question how do you live your life with the big C on your shoulder. I can only answer that from my perspective in the begining  every moment of every day was terrifying let alone waiting for psa results. It consumed every waking moment. 

As time has gone by I have to agree with Paul on the day it is that knee trembling here we go again moment but in between there is so much we need to accomplish and it's not a huge bucket list but just day to day living , again the same as Paul there isn't any room for Cancer in our lives we are far too busy getting on with life. Some day we will have to stop and open the door but for know we will keep going just the way we are.

So in the words of the song and you all know I love a good sing a long 

Que Sera , Sera 

What ever will be will be.

The futures not our's to see

Que Sera , Sera

BFN

JULIE X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 04 Mar 2015 at 01:41

How wonderful to see Paul , Brian and Trevor living with their Cancer in such a positive and pragmatic manner. It is so true life is for living. Some times I think it takes a threat of some kind to mobilise us into doing just this. I for one have wasted too much time worrying about things that may never happen without savouring the present . Cheers
Georgina from Oz

Ps sorry if I have got the names wrong you blokes are inspiring what ever your correct names..

Edited by member 04 Mar 2015 at 01:48  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 04 Mar 2015 at 09:37
The question I would like to ask is who is posting under Bri name, and what have you done with him?

Roy

User
Posted 04 Mar 2015 at 12:45

Don't know what you mean Roy ;-)

Hope you are doing well

Bri

User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 14:12

So the results are in and casodex appears to be working for now. At last appointment two months go PSA 42 now 18.8 so although the first two weeks saw a drop to 22, a slower but still downward trend noticeable. This feels good news and consultant felt that beginnings of a UTI at worse would have raised the PSA but unlikely to have major affect.

So pleased I have tolerated casodex so well, no sign of additional side effects and if anything in the last two months have felt well, reflecting I think six months away from a UTI as much as anything else.

He agreed to chase up onco appointment which I had requested but he was surprised had not been arranged yet. This is to discuss next steps but hopefully I may have a few months grace before those decisions will become pressing.

A briefish appointment really but it did the job.

User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 16:03

So pleased for you Yorkhull.
Long may it continue
Best Wishes
Sandra

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 16:23

Lovely news on the psa front Paul lets hope that the UTI's behave for you and you get at least another 6mths grace. It's also good that the side affects have been minimal .

BFN

Julie X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 16:47
Paul

I am really happy for you the result was good despite the UTI my instincts were not that worng after all.

I will be sending you a PM in a bit as one or two things for me to start organising before I go overseas.

xx

Mo

User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 18:13

Paul, I am so happy to se your update - something for us to celebrate at MOTS xxx

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 18:36

Excellent news Paul....and great to hear any side effects can be tolerated

Bri

User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 19:11
Absolutely delighted to read this update Paul, it just goes to show you can never tell about treatments, Casodex didn't work for John but Stillbestrill has worked for about 18 months. Excellent news, hoping the downward path continues.

Love Allison

User
Posted 09 Mar 2015 at 20:17
Hi Paul,

just read your thread and profile, it's lovely to read reports of continued response to treatment. Hope uti symptoms are settling, cranberry juice is supposed to be a good prophylactic treatment for uring infections.

Wishing you well with your treatment regime.

Lesley

User
Posted 10 Mar 2015 at 08:57

Thanks everyone for your kind wishes. This is an unexpected bonus and hopefully I will get a few months even a year's grace before the circles close in any more. For now I can look forward to a few months ahead, hope the UTIs stay away, and then Mill on the Soar.

I do feel very positive about this, as though Cancer can strike us down quickly and unrelentingly, it can also give us chance to breathe, take stock and focus our life. I am still here over three years on from diagnosis, that feels lucky and I am grateful for the time. To me I am enjoying that bonus of living and intend to keep smiling and getting the most from it. If Top Gun had not already said it Life is for Living!

Edited by member 10 Mar 2015 at 08:58  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 10 Mar 2015 at 09:30

Excellent news for you Paul. :-)

dave

User
Posted 10 Mar 2015 at 10:03

Keep it up, Paul. Your successes give hope to those not in the cure camp.

Best wishes.

Paul

Stay Calm And Carry On.
User
Posted 10 Mar 2015 at 11:54

Good news in your update Paul.. I like your site name.. It is kinda true for everyone. I agree sometimes a life changing thing like Cancer can give a renewed focus on living well.. Cheers Georgina

User
Posted 10 Mar 2015 at 14:17
So glad that things are good for you , there is hope for us all, I saw a film with my kids a few years back called Kung Fu Panda, not great apart from the lines, yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery but today is a present and is a gift ( or something like that!). Like you Paul, I am learning to use that gift the best way I can every day.

Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 10 Mar 2015 at 21:29

Thanks agin everyone.

Look forward to meeting you Kev at Mill on the Soar when there will be plenty of time to chat!

User
Posted 12 Mar 2015 at 17:55

Great news Paul,

it might have gone a long way that you took some Nottinghamshire Casodex http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-laughing.gif

Looking forward to catching up with you soon

Si

Don't deny the diagnosis; try to defy the verdict
User
Posted 14 Apr 2015 at 20:47

I want to share a theory with you all to see if it has any merit. As regular readers will know I have suffered from urine retention discovered in early 2012 only a few months after diagnosis whilst I was very ill with numerous urinary tract infections. When I was well again and had got rid of my catheter I had to train myself to self Catheterise (ISC) as I was retaining over 500 mls and at one time was having to do ISC four times a day. Over a period of six to eight months the amount retained reduced and in the end I was drawing off consistently less than 100 mls and with my uro I ceased to do ISC. 15 months later I realised that retention had returned and have now been doing ISC for 8/10 months. At first it was over 500 mls but has steadily reduced and in the last few weeks it has gone down to less than 200. I continue to ISC morning and night for now.

Now my theory is this. I saw a stylised picture of a prostate recently which showed normal prostate than a cancerous prostate which was swollen and squeezing the urethra. Now given those undertaking RT start with HT to reduce the size of the prostate, though I had bone met spread and therefore no RP or RT, I started HT. if one impact of the HT was a reduction in prostate size this would have coincided with that period when I reduced ISC from four times a day to ceasing altogether. Gradually over 2014 my PSA went up, probably indicating activity and maybe my prostate swelled again thus causing increased retention, hence my second bout of ISC. Now I have been on casodex since Jan and it appears for now to be working my retention rate is lowering, I am sleeping through the night with no nocturnal accidents.

My question - is this relationship a likely explanation or mere coincidence? Also could I predict when the casodex stops working if my retention starts to increase again. Or am I just talking nonsense.

Answers on a postcard please!

User
Posted 14 Apr 2015 at 20:55

I thought this was already known Paul. Seems pretty obvious to me and I am sure we had a member on IHT who was told that deciding when to go back onto HT depended on the urinary symptoms as much as the PSA. Was it TG perhaps?

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 14 Apr 2015 at 21:21

Hi Paul,

I don't think that you are talking nonsense at all , it makes perfect sense to me . I can see the reasoning and yes I do think it was Top Gun that brought this up.

BFN

Julie X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 14 Apr 2015 at 21:50

It sounds like a distinct correlation to me. As the tumour shrinks the pressure is removed from the urethra.
Having said that a return of the retention could also be due to the Prostate increasing in size as it can with age.

Bri

User
Posted 14 Apr 2015 at 22:25

Thanks for feedback. I am interested because I have never had a conversation with my uro which has put the two issues together. At this rate of I mprovement I might even be able to have a drink at Mill in the Soar without retreating constantly to the loo!

Edited by member 14 Apr 2015 at 22:25  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 14 Apr 2015 at 22:51
Great to hear of the improvement Paul, I must admit that I put John's recent issues with hesitancy, urgency and pain higher up down to a growing prostate. As his stillbestrill is failing his symptoms have become more evident. I think it correlates well.

Love Allison

User
Posted 15 Apr 2015 at 00:51

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Thanks for feedback. I am interested because I have never had a conversation with my uro which has put the two issues together. At this rate of I mprovement I might even be able to have a drink at Mill in the Soar without retreating constantly to the loo!

 

If you sit reasonably close to the toilets, we could just fix you up with a long piece of tubing and a funnel? 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 15 Apr 2015 at 10:08
Looks like there is a direct link Paul, I hope so because that means an improvement for you in terms of convenience and comfort.

It will be great to see you having a beer or two again as well, I know you enjoy imbibing just a little

Looking forward to seeing you soon

xx

Mo

User
Posted 24 Apr 2015 at 18:19

I've had a difficult week or so with a pain in my right leg that has caused me some distress. Though I did not think it was connected to any bone met growth you never know. I had a busy week and have limped around London twice. It wasn't until today I could get to the GP. I got my doctor's appointment but with a locum. She was helpful but did not really know what the problem was. After consulting with a colleague she thought that my leg pain might be a DVT (blood clot), apparently more likely as a cancer sufferer so I learnt that today. So I,m off to the hospital. NHS swings into action brilliantly when there is a life threatening problem. Six hours later, yes it took a while for ultra sound scans etc but I am cleared of a DVT so no major problem. Yet ironically I am not yet any closer to resolving what is wrong, though have the pain relief better organised. I think it is a muscular problem and hope it will continue to improve, if not back to the doctors. I will ask my GP to send a note to my uro consultant suggesting a bone scan just to be sure. They are reluctant to do them when the PSA is falling but I think it would be good to confirm (or not) things have not spread further.

Strange though I feel better, even though I still have the same problem. Sat in the Acute Medical Unit today surrounded by potential stroke victims, heart attacks etc etc I felt much better off. (I was surprised to see no one from the forum given our recent spate of heart problems!) I have felt really down this week and still have to resolve it all but it's the weekend, so I hope things will improve. Strange day indeed.

 
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