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PSA 7.3 - referred to urologist

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 18:23

Hello everyone,

I am 50 years old.

I'm hoping someone might reply to my concerns about PC. A month ago I was having the feeling of 'not completely emptying' and also going more often to the loo - I thought it might be stress because I get stressed easily and kept thinking about it. 

I did the PSA test on Monday (along with urine sample) after seeing GP. I came out at 7.3, I found out today (Wednesday) at the surgery after the receptionist told me that I needed to make a 'non-urgent appointment' with my GP. He had me down for next Monday, but I insisted on seeing him today.

After him telling me of the 7.3 PSA (urine normal) it felt anything but 'non-urgent' to me. He then did a DRE and said that it felt slightly enlarged but smooth.

So, I am now down to see urologist (within 2 weeks) for the MRI and presumably the biopsy. I have aches and pains, but always put it down to stress.

Clearly, I have googled everything and it looks like I have a 33% chance of having PC.

I'm not looking for reassurance, just some help about the next stages etc.

Thank you for listening.

H

 

User
Posted 05 Jan 2019 at 12:59

He is a school teacher, and via private message I asked him: “How do you get a point across to a particularly thick and unreceptive pupil?”

I told him to keep taking the tablets and seek assistance for his psychological issues that were apparently triggered by a potential PCa diagnosis, yet still remain despite his all-clear.

I wish Haig all the best, and hope he gets himself sorted soonest.

Cheers, John.

Edited by member 05 Jan 2019 at 14:34  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 06 Jan 2019 at 09:56
Haig

It is a counsellors job to listen to you and help you deal with your negative thoughts. I would strongly suggest you see one as soon as you can because it is your thoughts that are causing you issues not a disease you do not have. They will be able to help. It is what they are trained for. Don’t forget that others are affected by your situation and you will help them as as yourself if you seek help.

PP

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 22:06
Firstly, prostate cancer, unless it’s advanced, which it assuredly isn’t with a PSA of 7, doesn’t cause aches and pains. That’s just an overactive imagination thinking the worst. You may have PCa (as we call it in these parts), but localised PCa is eminently treatable. Don’t worry - a PCa diagnosis is not a death sentence!

As you say, next will be a visit to a urologist. He or she will do another DRE (they’ll be much better at it than your GP!) and then probably an MRI scan and a biopsy. Don’t stress about the biopsy - believe me, the anticipation is far worse than the event! It’s not pleasant, but it’s roughly the same order of “not pleasant” as, say, having a filling at the dentist. About two weeks after the biopsy you’ll know the result.

I said “don’t worry” earlier, but that’s me looking back on it from the other side of the experience. It is a worrying time, and you’ll be waiting a long time (at LEAST a month, more likely two months) until you’ll know what’s going on one way or the other. All I can really suggest is keep yourself busy and try not to dwell on it. Even if it is PCa, it’s curable. You don’t die from localised prostate cancer, although you may well die with it.

This site has loads of useful information leaflets. Download them and read them. Phone the freephone number and talk to the nurses if you have any medical questions - they’re wonderful people.

You’ve come to the right place to get support. Welcome to the club! We’ve all (well, all of us of the male persuasion at least) been through it and know exactly how stressful a time this is.

All the best,

Chris

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User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 22:06
Firstly, prostate cancer, unless it’s advanced, which it assuredly isn’t with a PSA of 7, doesn’t cause aches and pains. That’s just an overactive imagination thinking the worst. You may have PCa (as we call it in these parts), but localised PCa is eminently treatable. Don’t worry - a PCa diagnosis is not a death sentence!

As you say, next will be a visit to a urologist. He or she will do another DRE (they’ll be much better at it than your GP!) and then probably an MRI scan and a biopsy. Don’t stress about the biopsy - believe me, the anticipation is far worse than the event! It’s not pleasant, but it’s roughly the same order of “not pleasant” as, say, having a filling at the dentist. About two weeks after the biopsy you’ll know the result.

I said “don’t worry” earlier, but that’s me looking back on it from the other side of the experience. It is a worrying time, and you’ll be waiting a long time (at LEAST a month, more likely two months) until you’ll know what’s going on one way or the other. All I can really suggest is keep yourself busy and try not to dwell on it. Even if it is PCa, it’s curable. You don’t die from localised prostate cancer, although you may well die with it.

This site has loads of useful information leaflets. Download them and read them. Phone the freephone number and talk to the nurses if you have any medical questions - they’re wonderful people.

You’ve come to the right place to get support. Welcome to the club! We’ve all (well, all of us of the male persuasion at least) been through it and know exactly how stressful a time this is.

All the best,

Chris

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 22:13
With a PSA of 7.3 and an enlarged prostate further investigation is warranted.

The next stage should be an MRI scan. If it shows suspicious areas then a biopsy would be the next step.

Hopefully a template biopsy rather than a TRUS biopsy as it can target the suspicious areas.

It isn’t an absolute certainty that you have prostate cancer as PSA can be raised with BPH (essentially an enlarged benign prostate) or with infection or recent exercise/sexual activity.

Only the biopsy can confirm one way or the other.

I would hope for the best but prepare for the worst until you know definitely.

Hopefully the scan and biopsy will be organised quickly so that you get an answer to what is going on.

It may be worth downloading the toolkit on this site to see what could happen next.

Best wishes,

Ian

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 00:19

The ‘Toolkit’ referred to above is a thick information folder covering every aspect of this disease, and although I spend all day on this IPad, I prefer to have a tangible paper copy to hand rather than a PDF download.

It’s free from this charity, so order a copy and you’ll get it in the post within a couple of days. Hopefully you won’t need to look too deeply into it!

Look up Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH) and cross your fingers, as that can cause symptoms similar to your own.

Best of luck.

Cheers, John.

Edited by member 22 Nov 2018 at 00:26  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 07:26

Hi Haig.

I was first tested Aug 2017 and had a PSA of 5.7. I was yhen lost on the system and had blood test again this year in September and my PSA had rIsen to 7.6 I then went through the system and had DRE, MRI and Biopsy and was finally diagnosed with PC 13 th November I have an appointment with my MCMillan nurse today to let her know which treatment I wish to go with.

Basically what I am saying is don’t worry too much about the time scale as it sounds like as with me they have caught you early.

Edited by member 22 Nov 2018 at 09:01  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 10:11

Dear Chris,

You are so kind in replying and it has helped me a lot. I am still wrecked with worry and to be honest the GP wasn't exactly reassuring, which I guess they aren't always supposed to be. If he'd have said the things you have said, I would be feeling a little better about it all. 

Again, I cannot thank you enough for your time.

 

Haig

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 10:12

Thank you very much for your kind words. It is so good to speak with people who have been through this and not colleagues just telling me to be positive, which I am not able to be.

 

Haig

Edited by member 22 Nov 2018 at 16:01  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 10:14

Thank you for taking the time to reply to me & I am sorry that you too have been through this. I am scared, not for me, but for wife and son. I feel that it is too early for me to leave them right now. 

Thank you so much,

Haig

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 10:21

Thank you, Ian. I am a real whimp, which doesn't help. I hope it isn't PCa but if it is, I feel a bit more 'prepared' to face it with everyone's kind words.

Haig

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 13:01

Thank you Mr Angry.

I am coming back to the thread between teaching lessons at school; however, I find that all of a sudden I will well-up (not in front of the kids) and feel emotional and so sorry for myself. I think this is what I meant by being a wimp. I can't help thinking of turning up at the GP's surgery and finding out that my results were normal and how thankful I would have been. It just wasn't to be though and I wish I could cope better at this point.

 

Haig

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 13:12

Hi again Haig.

unless you are planning to get run over on the way to your next appointment I don’t think you will be leaving anyone for a while yet.

i know it is difficult at the moment not know but try not to look at to much on the net about the subject. Best thing is just to read the information on this site as it is probably the most accurate availabl, also read some of the posts on the forum of what other men have been though it has certainly helped me in the last couple of weeks when I have been trying to decide on which treatment I am going with.

as I said in my previous post it looks like they have caught you in the early stages and as others have said it is a very slow growing C. 

I have decided to go down the HT/RT route and have taken my first Hormone tablet today and will be having Radio Therapy in about 3 to 4 months, I have a holiday booked the beginning of April and have been told that if necessary the Radio therapy can be postponed until our return.

i am telling you this to give you an idea of time scale so as to try to stem your worry about having to wait for your appointmen.

 

Hope this helps 

Bob

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 15:55

Hello again Bob,

You are right - I need to leave the net alone and to be honest there isn't probably a web page that I haven't visited on the subject. I am now sticking to this forum, because it is basically the only thing that has properly helped. I guess I have two chances. The first that it might not be PCa and the second that it is caught early. it's not the procedures that frighten me, although I wouldn't put them on my Christmas list, it's the outcome of it having spread so far.

I am in a better place thanks to all these messages of fact and support, but I am still so pessimistic about it all. Yesterday, for the first time ever I considered taking my own life, as I couldn't see anything but darkness. The thought didn't last long but it was there.

 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 16:49
I have said here before that I have been completely chilled about my cancer diagnosis and subsequent surgery and have had no psychological trauma regarding it whatsoever. But then maybe I have and that’s why I keep posting here 😂.

Obviously bad news affects everyone in different ways.

I have been an avid Googler over the past year, and I learned that the cancer I ‘had’, potentially to return someday, is unlikely to be fatal. One oncologist told me I am cured (silly sod) and another said I won’t die of it.

Morbidity really depends on the staging, and in my case the future looks bright.

Pancreatic, liver and lung cancers are in a different league, as someone here today made the analogy, and are in the European Champions League, whereas mine is languishing down in Division 3, like Coventry City itself!

Best of luck.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 17:01
I’m with John and completely ok with my diagnosis and prognosis

Haig sit down with your wife and son if he is old enough and talk it through with them do not bottle it all up to yourself.

There is always someone here to help including wives of sufferers.

Bob

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 17:25
Haig, I know exactly what you're going through. When I was waiting for test results, and even worse when I was diagnosed, I went through some very dark days indeed (as people here can attest!). My advice would be to make an appointment with your GP and get some medication to help you cope with it - it really does help. My GP put me on a drug called Sertraline, which helped me tremendously.

You'll get through it. Everybody does. That may seem difficult to believe right now, but one day in a few months time (assuming the diagnosis is PCa, which obviously it may not be!) you'll wake up in the morning and think "I've got prostate cancer. OK. Now let's get on with life". Localised prostate cancer is curable. It's vanishingly unlikely to kill you. It takes a long time for that to sink it, "cancer" being such a scary word, but it does. I was diagnosed back in May, and started hormone treatment in August with radiotherapy due next February. I'm enjoying life again, and cancer is just a normal part of that life now.

Chin up!

Chris

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 17:35

Thanks again, Chris. Yes, I am going to try to see GP tomorrow to get something to calm me a bit. I might also see if I can go private to speed things up? To be honest, if someone could put me to sleep for the next 2 weeks and have the tests done and then wake me up for the results, that would be ideal. It's weird, because I am not hoping for it not to be PCa, as I have already in my mind resigned myself to that, I am just hoping for the localised diagnosis. The inspiration for me has been the way that everyone has almost made it sound banal and I can cope with banal, believe me. 

Haig

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 07:43

Amazon7,

I can see your initial line in email inbox, but can't see the post on the forum. A gremlin perhaps?

Haig

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 09:47

Chris

i admire your stoical approach but from my perspective I've dealt with the Big C by compartmentalising my life into two parts, Life 1 and Life 2. Life 2 is so much different and 3 months after diagnosis its on my mind(obsessively) all the time. Interests i enjoyed in life 1 have fallen by the wayside as I try and deal with the treatment and the changes it has brought. eg I've no idea who my local football team are playing tomorrow and i don't really care, in Life 1 I had the fixtures mapped out. My daily 4 mile walks have stopped, can't energise myself to start walking again.
Just hope a few months down the road I can fully accept this and start enjoying life 2 like i used to enjoy life 1.
What I'm determined to do is to stay strong for my wife and family, who I guiltily feel are the victims in this diagnosis, I'm the poor sap who has to deal with it.

take care guys

John

Edited by member 23 Nov 2018 at 09:48  | Reason: new

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 10:52

Oh, I'm OK now, John, but it took me a hell of a long time to come to terms with it. I had a three-month wait between diagnosis and the start of treatment, and for a while every test I had seemed to find something new and awful. The MRI scan for the PCa found an (unrelated) kidney tumour and an aneurysm in the artery leading to my spleen which could have burst at any time and killed me. At one time it was a case of "Why me?" and feeling very sorry for myself indeed! But you get through it. Aneurysm now fixed. Kidney surgically removed. Prostate cancer being sorted. Taking it one day at a time is all you can do, and believe me, no matter how bleak things get (and they got very bleak indeed for me!), you find a way to cope. It's not as if you have any choice . There is light at the end of the tunnel, no matter how hard that may be to believe at the moment. Just take things one day at a time.

Chris

 

Edited by member 23 Nov 2018 at 10:55  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 12:47

Haig,

Feeling resigned to the fact that PCa was a possible, or even an inevitable outcome, was my exact outlook. 'What will be will be.'

Initially, after much internet searching, i was well informed but none the wiser. This forum however, and the kind souls that post their own experiences, has been invaluable. Accepting the possibility has helped in dealing with the reality.

It's not easy, we've all been there, and it does take time to before all the necessary tests are done. Continue to be proactive and as positive as you can possibly be at this time.

I will just reiterate what others have said...early stage PCa can be cured and/or managed. Hopefully, your raised PSA is due to other factors and i will keep my fingers crossed for you.

All the best,

Neil.

 

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 12:56

Thank you, Neil. 

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 13:32

Today, I just feel numbed by it all. 

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 14:07

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Today, I just feel numbed by it all. 

H: I’m very sorry to hear that.

Have you got a urology appointment date yet?

The ideal sequence if anything untoward is found apart from your urine retention, should be, of course at the behest of your consultant:

1. mp MRI scan at 3 Tesla resolution, if possible, then if suspicions are raised:

2. Template targeted biopsy under some kind of anaesthetic (avoid TRUS). If biopsy positive then:

3. Treatment plan discussed with your Multi-Disciplinary Team, with “curative intent”.

4. Surgery or treatment with the aim of being cancer-free in 2019. That’s if you even have it.......

I hope you ordered the information Toolkit folder as that explains everything more eloquently than I can.

Best of luck as ever.

Cheers, John.

 

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 14:55

Haig,

Call one of the specialist nurses via this website. The number is at the top of the page.

If at all possible have a change of scenery...a weekend away with loved one's. Your wife will be feeling your anxiety too, while also dealing with her own.

At this stage your fears are palpable and understandable. However, with your symptoms and possibly having an enlarged prostrate, it is entirely feasible that your PSA is raised for those reasons.

Wish i could do more to help. Take care.

Neil.

 

 

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 15:21

Neil & John,

As usual, replies on here help me rationalise this all a little better. I have no appointment yet - the GP saw me this Wednesday morning at 10am; I guess I need to hang on until sometime this week. The days feel long and I could hear the sound of the groundsman cutting grass in the mild drizzle. I envied him simply because he doesn't have a high PSA.

Haig

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 15:55
Haig, from what you have reported, PCa seems very unlikely and I wouldn't think a biopsy at all likely. I think you may have classic benign prostatic hyperphasia and will be given some pills to shrink the prostate and restore normal urination. I would recommend taking some advice about your anxiety, though. Not that I'm recommending pills for that! Just restore some balance to your thinking.

AC

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 17:15

AC,

If you're right, please send me your address and I will post out a bottle of something for Xmas. If you're not, at least it made me feel good for a wee while (no pun intended).

Haig

User
Posted 24 Nov 2018 at 09:24

Good morning everyone. I hope that all of you are well and although I do not know any of you personally, I mean this with complete sincerity. I guess many of you are finding me a little tiresome by now. Don't worry, I feel the same about myself, so don't take it to heart. I am not as bad as I was after finding out about my 7.3 PSA and slightly enlarged prostate, which was 'smooth' (was that intended to make me feel any better about the whole bloody thing?). I hope to get to see the urologist next week rather than this waiting game, which I struggle with. I still feel a complete imposter amongst you and should really have only begun to talk after knowing the result of further investigations. In terms of the symptoms, it seems that BPH and PCa are pretty similar, but both talk of needing the loo at night and I don't have this. I guess it is all so different for all of us etc.

Anyway, I'm going to leave you all alone until after the urologist tells me what I have. I promise not to bother you. Until then, keep safe all of you and without you, my last 4 days would have been yet harder to negotiate.

Haig

User
Posted 24 Nov 2018 at 09:55
"Smooth" is good, Haig. A prostate with tumours feels "knobbly". So yes, that should make you feel good!

Cheers,

Chris

User
Posted 24 Nov 2018 at 10:43

Haig.

Dont worry about bothering people that is what this forum is all about.

Better to put all your worries in print than to bottle them all up inside. I have started to use this site as part of my therapy as I find talking about what I have is my way of coping with it. I know that some of my friends are sick to death of me talking about it but I don’t care as it is helping me.

hang on in there and what ever the result next week me back and talk it over.

 

Bob

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 09:26

Morning all. My appointment is Tuesday 4th of December. Seems an age away, but at least I have a date now. 

All the best,

Haig

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 09:59
You’re not bothering us at all, and I hope you will shortly bugger off and not need to ‘bother’ us ever again!

Best of luck on the 4th🤞

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 17:34

I thought to stay away but I'm back, I'm afraid. So sorry. I came across a chap (on this site forum) who was 63 years old, PSA 7 and he was asking about the urologist's procedure regarding MRI & Biopsy. Anyway, he had MRI and biopsy same day, I think. Worryingly for me, after having been calmed by many on here, his MRI came back clear but the biopsy 12 point test showed one slow-growing cancer cell. I think he went for active surveillance.

Anyway, I naively thought I might get the MRI scan done and result back same day, there and then. "You're alright mate, get outta here" sort of result. Wishful thinking, of course. A number of things: a PSA of 7 is slightly lower than mine and cancer found in this chap and then I hear stories of over a week, 10 days wait before you get called back to do the biopsy. I haven't ordered the toolkit suggested because I feel so saturated with gloom that I couldn't face it. Haven't called the nurse number either. Keep googling and coming back to you guys - that's all I do. 

Haig

Edited by member 25 Nov 2018 at 17:34  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 17:56

Haig,

Whatever the results of an MRI a biopsy should be performed...i would insist on it.

With your present fear of the worst,  it is the only sure way to rule out PCa - and give peace of mind.

Neil.

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:08

Thanks Neil & Mr A. You are both gents to spend time replying to me. 

 

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:10

Hi, I know what you are going through and maybe it is easy for me to say this but wait until you see the uro and don't jump to conclusions.

I had a psa of upto 15 at last count, was getting up some nights 9-10 times, prostate was massively enlarged, had biopsy, scans, cystoscopy, meds etc etc finally the uro diagnosed BPH and done a Turp.

I am about 5 weeks post op have good flow no bleeding and I sleep all night, still waiting for histology but I assume that was clear as they have not called me, I go for uro appointment on 28/11.

What I am trying to say is try to look to the positive, it doesn't mean you have pc just because your psa is high, bph will cause that too. I understand only too well the stress you are feeling, but don't count the losses until the race is run, easy for me to say now I am nearly home and dry, but I feel good now and that is important, in a few days maybe that will change when I see the uro, but I am thinking positive.

Try to relax, going to the uro doesn't mean pc it could be BPH.

Good luck.

Steve. 

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:16

Thanks Steve. Good luck to you on the 28th - I really hope you can move on. I wish I could have the mental strength of all on here - staying positive is something I am not able to manage. I have tried. 

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:33

'The days feel long and I could hear the sound of the groundsman cutting grass in the mild drizzle. I envied him simply because he doesn't have a high PSA.'

Nice words Haig,  do you have a tune for it?

When I was first diagnosed I used to wake up in the night which isn't unusual, but then I'd get a fear that something was wrong but I couldn't think what it was. Then I remembered and worried a bit before going back to sleep. That lasted about a week.  The words aren't that good, not sure if a tune will fix it.

Don't worry about posting your fears. People talk about the most personal matters on here.  Some of the ladies know more about your very personal fears and problems than most men.

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:39

Hello Peter. No tune, I'm afraid - just the way I was thinking at the time. Waking up at night suggests that you had moments of sleep - I just lie there with some pretend snoring, so my wife thinks I have knocked off. Then God knows what I do for the next few hours - I need some pills probably, but I don't want to go to my local doctor's surgery right now. If I could hibernate, I would.

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:48

Hey Haig... 

It's a bugger waiting for tests and results ....we've all been there! 

Try to put your teaching skills into practice and focus on the facts you have before you ..... 

Until you have the results of any tests / biopsies etc you won't know what your situation is... 

I know it's bloody stressful and we all deal with it in different ways ....in your case it may well be not Pca at all! 

Life is full of obstacles and hurdles to overcome....you must know that... 

Maybe a visit to your GP and explain your anxiety will help?  ....he'll only dish out a few pills though .. if they help meantime that's fine innit! 

If it helps you keep on posting your concerns  here..... sometimes the people on this site give more support than a GP would when it comes dealing with this stuff  

Best Wishes 
Luther 



Edited by member 25 Nov 2018 at 18:57  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 18:53
Hi Haig.

Perhaps I am one of the lucky ones as since my first test right up to my diagnosis I have had no feeling of fear and foreboding so I do not really know what you are going through.

One thing that that does not seem to have been suggested is to check if you have a support group in your area, if so it may be that they have a meeting between now and your appointment so you would be able to go along a talk face to face with like minded men.

Bob

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 19:08

Luther, thanks and all you say is right. Maybe I'm being deluded in thinking I might have dealt with this better at 60, rather than 50 - but probably not. If I knew my son was settled (he's at uni and knows nothing of this) & my wife was okay and retired etc, then I think I'd be less of a wimp about it. Both rely on me though and that's because I try to do it all for them both. BPH, PSA, DRE and bloody Gleason - I hate all these new additions to my vocab and wish they would simply FO.

 

All the best, mate.

Haig

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 19:13

Hi Bob,

This has become my support group. I don't want to see another soul about it. If I get out of this s..., then this forum will have helped more than any robotic, insensitive GP could ever have done. 

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 19:23

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Hi Bob,

This has become my support group. I don't want to see another soul about it. If I get out of this s..., then this forum will have helped more than any robotic, insensitive GP could ever have done. 

 

Haig.

i am not talking about GP’s. All around this Country there are groups of trained cancer support where people like myself and you meet as a group and are able to either talk one to one or in a group, to gove you an example in Chely we have one called Maggie’s. Google it, I know you will anyway, just to see what support is available either that or contact McMillan. 

Do something because you really need support from professionals as well as all the good meaning people on this site.

 

Bob

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 19:34

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Luther, thanks and all you say is right. Maybe I'm being deluded in thinking I might have dealt with this better at 60, rather than 50 - but probably not. If I knew my son was settled (he's at uni and knows nothing of this) & my wife was okay and retired etc, then I think I'd be less of a wimp about it. Both rely on me though and that's because I try to do it all for them both. BPH, PSA, DRE and bloody Gleason - I hate all these new additions to my vocab and wish they would simply FO.

 

All the best, mate.

Haig



No problem Haig,
if it's any consolation...whatever age you are  ie... 50 / 60 etc  it's no easier ...believe me!.. 

You're not being a wimp matey ... keep on talking...it's better to to do that than bottle it all up!

With any luck all those additions to your vocab will be a thing of the past in a week or so 

Good advice from Bobk by the way 

Best Wishes 
Luther 

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 19:37

Thanks Luther - I probably sounded insensitive about the age thing - of course it isn't easier for any of you. Sorry.

User
Posted 25 Nov 2018 at 21:05

Goodnight all. Apologies I have been so brusque, morose and zoned about it all; I'll work hard on pretending to lighten-up. Time for some fake snoring.

 

User
Posted 26 Nov 2018 at 06:23

User
Posted 26 Nov 2018 at 06:41

Damn. We're on page 2 already. 

User
Posted 26 Nov 2018 at 09:03
Haig,

As I think I mentioned in an earlier post, unfortunately you are in for a lot of waiting. It'll take 1-2 weeks to find out the results of the MRI (imaging is done by a radiographer, who is basically a technician trained to operate the machine, and then the result is sent to a radiologist - a doctor - to be interpreted), and similarly around a 2-week wait for biopsy results.

You should still press for a biopsy even if the MRI comes back clear. My MRI was clear but the biopsy found cancer.

Unfortunately that's just the way it is.

Cheers,

Chris

 
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