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Very worried about referral for high PSA

User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 13:48
Oh flip.

That was a very, very different consultation from anything I've had before.

Every other consultant I've seen it's been a rather breezy "I'm confident that everything you've got can be completely cured".

With this chap it was "I want you to have a skeletal scan MRI and if it comes back positive you've probably got five years to live".

So now I've got this MRI arranged for Wednesday and I know that if it comes back positive it's basically a death sentence. How the heck does anyone cope with that? He's going to give me the results over the phone a few days after the scan.

Scared absolutely shitless, to be perfectly honest.

Chris

User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 13:51

 That is totally unprofessional Chris what he should’ve said is “let’s get you in for skeletal MRI and then come back to see me when we have the results“


 With some of the comments and articles I have read on here I am beginning to believe just how lucky I am at the hospital I am registered with 

Edited by member 16 Jun 2018 at 13:51  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 14:04
I thought I was just going to see him to arrange a template biopsy, Alan. He is going to arrange that, but he also came out with this bombshell that a PSA of 30+ means that the cancer may be metastatic and that if it is he would anticipate around a five year life expectancy. Nobody's every suggested to me before that there's any possibility of metastatic cancer. I'm completely shell-shocked, to be honest with you.

Chris
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 14:19
He sounds delightful; I am so sorry that you didn't have someone with a more positive manner. Fingers crossed he is just being cautious.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 14:30
Feeling like ending it all right now, Lyn, to be honest. Don't know how I'm going to be able to cope with the stress of this. Massive panic attack.
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 15:35
The day of my Template Biopsy with a psa of 43 , my Uro said it could possibly be prostatitis or a very aggressive cancer. The 2 TRUS and MRI and bone scans showed nothing prior. But here I am 3 years post surgery living a normal life at 51 with no treatment. Psa was massive post op and they suspected Mets so I refused RT on a QOL basis and recovery. My Onco gave me a probable six years when I was 50. He knows I don’t want treatment until I’m desperate. I want life not cancer and am fighting it my own way. Just try try try to stay calm till you get results. My earliest posts were like yours. I didn’t want surgery at all and just wanted to die. In hindsight that may have been the right thing given my prognosis now. BUT I’ve had lots of love and bonding and holidays and in some ways have enjoyed life and marriage and love more since the cancer. Good luck honestly

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 17:15
s***, I just can't handle this. Never felt so desperate in my life. Why the hell does this guy tell me this when everyone else has been relatively optimistic? Floods of tears. Panic. Utter despair. How to get through the night? Booze and Valium? Sorry.
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 17:41
Yikes Chris I didn’t mean to upset you. Really sorry. You simply don’t know anything yet and the worry and waIting is always the hardest part. It could honestly all be fine. You can do booze, or you can do Diazepam, but please don’t do both together. I tried that — very messy
Stay strong

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 17:50
Good advice from CJ - this could just be an onco with a tihs bedside manner and large ego.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 17:51
Chris, by "this guy" I meant my consultant, not you. You said nothing to upset me.

My oncologist (who referred me to this consultant) has a clinic on a Monday. I'm going to phone his secretary at 8am on Monday morning and try to get in to see him to explain what's happened and ask his advice. He seemed like a really nice guy when I last saw him.

Chris
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 17:51
Not sure whether the PCUK nurses work at weekends but a call to them or Samaritans may be a better option than the ones you are currently considering
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 18:26

Chris, There is always a chance of metastasis, but look at my example, PSA of 38, Gleason 4:5  and no mets. So please try to stay calm my friend it’s rubbish to tell you what this man said. The template biopsies will accurately tell you your Gleason score and that will be matched up with your scans. I have 60% left and 20% right , with one core being 100% cancer but no mets. Template biopsies are to see how much cancer you have in the prostate, not predict mets. Don’t beat yourself up till all your results are in and cross referenced by an oncologist 

Edited by member 16 Jun 2018 at 18:35  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 21:00
This may sound like a strange thing to say, Alan, but I'm really hoping I do have more active cancer in my prostate that the TRUS missed, because if I don't, microscopic bone mets are by far the most likely cause for my high PSA, and that means "terminal".

Trying not to panic and tell myself that I need to keep calm and wait for the scan results and the template biopsy, but it's difficult, particularly considering the fact that the template results may be six weeks away.
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 21:17

Chris, look at my timeline, template biopsy 1st March results 14th March I think it was.  If most hospitals proceed like mine in the Urology department they have an MDT meeting once a week, in my case, every Wednesday morning and in this meeting will be a Urologist, cancer nurses, surgical and other clinical personnel.  I expect some others on here may have a point of view but I cannot see in any circumstance where you would have to wait six weeks for the result.


For you to be told that a PSA of 30 means you have mets and a 5 year life expectancy is just not true


No Oncologist should even talk about life expectancy until all the case data is sssembled and analysed at MDT and it seems clear from the information you have posted they do not yet have all they need to come to an informed proffesional decision

Edited by member 16 Jun 2018 at 21:24  | Reason: Spelling errors

User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 21:41
Sorry, Alan, I should have explained. I’m going away on holiday for a fortnight in the first two weeks of July. The consultant can’t do the template next week and, given that he operates on a Thursday, doesn’t want to do it the following week, only 24h before I go away, in case of complications. That means that it won’t happen until the third week in July at the earliest, and then 2 weeks’ wait for the lab results. Hence I won’t learn the results until early August. A long wait.

Chris
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 21:48

This may seem easy to say Chris,  but I had a  similar situation in April they wanted to start me on bicalutamide on the 15th of March and then two weeks later my first Decapeptyl injection.  I haever booked a holiday to go away to Majorca cycling in October last year before I knew about my PCa  and as I had trained for six months for the holiday and paid for flights and accommodation I was worried about the affect the hormone therapy would  have on me cycling.  The input  I got from my oncologist and my cancer nurse was go on your holiday and enjoy yourself,  it’s important to be in the right frame of mind to start your treatment and three weeks is it going to be crucial so I managed to go away have a fantastic holiday and to be honest I hardly thought about my impending treatment and my situation.


 I know your situation is radically different to where I was then and now. I think the point I’m trying to make is take the break Chris, you need it go away and make a dam good attempt at enjoying yourself 


Alan

User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 22:01
If the skeletal scan comes back negative, Alan (and I should know the scan results either next Friday or the following Monday) then I’ll certainly go away and enjoy myself and not worry about the template biopsy. If the result is not negative, then I don’t need anyone to tell me that that’s a death sentence. Can I go away on holiday just having learned that? I don’t think I could. I don’t think anyone could.

Praying for a clear scan.

Chris

User
Posted 17 Jun 2018 at 13:35
Chris, you have two threads going. Not helpful. Metastatic PCa is NOT terminal. You are NOT under a death sentence. You PCa is treatable, with a wide, increasingly wider range of treatments available. A positive state of mind will help get you through this. Plan to enjoy your holiday and let nothing get in the way of that!

AC
User
Posted 17 Jun 2018 at 14:43

Can I ask then, please, whether a skeletal MRI is a routine procedure when determining the staging of PCa, or do you think it's being done only because of the seeming discrepancy between my PSA level and what's so far been found? Would there be any reason to do it if metastatic cancer were not considered a likely diagnosis?


Thanks,


Chris


 

Edited by member 17 Jun 2018 at 14:44  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 17 Jun 2018 at 15:20

Chris, I have not heard the term skeletal MRI before. My understanding of MRI is it’s for soft tissue imaging. Bone scan is for skeletal? I may be wrong, just trying to help

User
Posted 17 Jun 2018 at 15:25

No, this isn't a bone scan, Alan. That (as you know) involves nuclear medicine and an injection of a radioactive marker. What I'm having on Wednesday is an MRI scan to look at my bones, presumably for the purpose of looking for signs of mets, and I'm told that no marker will be involved.


If anyone does know more about it, it would be good to know! Failing that, I'll ask the medical staff when I go on Wednesday what the purpose of the MRI is.


Chris

Edited by member 17 Jun 2018 at 15:41  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 17 Jun 2018 at 15:53
Hmm. Your question led me to do a little reading, Alan, and now I'm puzzled too, because it seems that an MRI can only image soft tissue, not bones. I wonder if he when he said "skeletal scan" he just meant a scan of my whole body to see if anything else shows up (like the kidney tumour did)? Maybe I'm worrying unnecessarily about him looking for bone mets?

Chris
User
Posted 18 Jun 2018 at 11:51
I phoned my oncologist's secretary first thing this morning, and my oncologist kindly phoned me personally an hour later. I explained that the urologist had said he thinks my cancer may be metastatic, and I was in a panic about it, and the oncologist went up the wall. He said that there's no way the urologist should have said that, and that there's absolutely no evidence to support the idea that I have anything other than localised cancer. He supports the idea of the skeletal MRI scan on Wednesday (which apparently can pick up bone tumours) to rule this out, but says that given the fact that neither my previous mpMRI scan nor the two subsequent CT scans picked up any bone abnormalities makes him pretty confident that the scan will come back negative. He said that he'll personally look out for the scan results at the imaging MDT meeting on Friday and give me a ring to let me know the results as soon as the meeting finishes.

So I'm feeling a little calmer after that.

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 08:14
Today is the day of my "skeletal scan" MRI. Feeling really scared about this one (not the scan, but the outcome). I'm trying to maintain a positive outlook, but I must admit that I'm absolutely dreading the phone call with the results.

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 08:52

Hi, Im new to this forum all I can say is in 2003 I had a PSA of 27 , I had the radical surgery with nerve sparing which then was new, Its the best thing ive ever had and 15 years down the line still going well.


Budgie.


 

User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 09:10

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Today is the day of my "skeletal scan" MRI. Feeling really scared about this one (not the scan, but the outcome). I'm trying to maintain a positive outlook, but I must admit that I'm absolutely dreading the phone call with the results.

Chris


Tomorrow, Thursday 21st is my 2 month review to see if I have responded to the hormone therapy. I too am really apprehensive on what the outcome might be. I know I am T2c (locally advanced) but that doesn’t help. Comments on here by Lyn should have made me more positive, but we are human after all. We can compare our news soon Chris. Chin up mate

User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 09:53
Very best of luck to you, too, Alan. Here's hoping for good news for us both.

Very busy day for me tomorrow. At 9am I'm seeing the vascular surgeon to find out (hopefully!) what treatment the vascular MDT recommended for my aneurysm when they met last Friday (best outcome would be "none"!), and then at 11:15 I'm seeing the renal surgeon at a different hospital (luckily only half an hour away from the first), at which meeting I hope to get a definite plan for my kidney surgery. So on that side of things it looks as if things are really moving forward now and I hope there'll be a definite plan in place by tomorrow.

Just the staging of the prostate cancer that's the big worry. Hope my oncologist's optimism is justified! Keeping everything crossed for a negative scan result.

Take care,

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 15:50
OK, scan done. I was in the scanner for an hour and a half, which is an awfully long time to lie completely still without moving a muscle! Now just a case of waiting for the results. The radiologist said "either Friday or Monday" for the results. I really hope it's Friday - don't really want to go through another weekend not knowing.

Still, another step along the journey completed.

Chris
User
Posted 21 Jun 2018 at 13:46
Phone call from my oncologist at 11 o'clock this morning, and he's also emailed me the radiology report. Scan has come back clear: "No convincing evidence of bony metastatic disease" (which apparently is as far as they're ever willing to commit themselves when it comes to reporting negative findings). I was scanned from eye-level to pelvis and it did find all the other stuff I knew I had wrong with me (which is good) and nothing new (which is even better). Feeling as though the weight of the world has been lifted from my shoulders. I've gone through some pretty rocky times along this journey so far, and I'm sure there'll be other bad days in the future, but this has probably been the worst week of my life, and I've come through it, so feeling utterly drained, but very, very relieved. Maybe now I can catch up on a week's eating and sleeping!

Some slightly less encouraging news about the splenic aneurysm, which was looked at by the vascular MDT on Friday last. 4cm aneurysm only 1.5cm away from my spleen. What they've decided to do is a procedure where they'll try to insert lots of tiny coils into the aneurysm, with the idea that blood will clot around these and completely block it off ("embolyse" was the word he used). Apparently, though, there is a high risk (he wouldn't put a number on it, but I gather it's kind of the expected outcome) that doing this will block off the blood supply to the spleen, resulting in the necessity to remove the spleen (a "splenectomy"). You can live without a spleen, but it makes you more susceptible to infections, since the spleen is an important source of white blood cell production. So, the plan is that I'm to start a 4-week course of being vaccinated against every disease known to man at my GPs, and then at the end of the 4 weeks be admitted to hospital for this procedure to insert the coils. They'll then keep me in for observation. If all goes well, fine. If not, there'll be a surgical team ready and waiting to perform the splenectomy. This would be quite significant surgery. If they open me up to do this, they'll also remove the whole of my left kidney (where the tumour is) at the same time, to avoid having to do two operations. If the process to embolyse the aneurysm is successful, I'd go ahead with the robotic partial kidney removal shortly after.

So, we have a plan! I'm feeling really (unreasonably, in fact!) happy now. And it's looking likely that the prostate cancer is localised, after all, so it all should be fixable.

I feel that this is a turning point in my journey. The first time I've had a scan that hasn't actually shown anything else wrong!

Chris
User
Posted 21 Jun 2018 at 14:04

You and me both then Chris😀


8 weeks of Decapeptyl Hormone Therapy has reduced my PSA from 38 at diagnosis to 6 today. To most a reading of 6 would be bad news, but for me it’s excellent.


My Testosterone was at 0.8 not sure what normal reading for 66 year old should be, but I’m sure Oncologist said 6


So my curative pathway looks established. I get second Decapeptyl IM injection 23rd July, then start External Beam RT 6th August and only 4 weeks, as I have responded so well.


I feel the best mentally, since initial diagnosis late January, nearly 5 months ago minus a week.


Heres wishing you the best Chris and I’m glad things are brighter for you. Get that holiday in soon as you can


Alan

User
Posted 21 Jun 2018 at 14:10

That's brilliant news, Alan - I'm delighted for you!


Fingers crossed, we're both on the road to a cure now. I'm looking forward to my holiday now .


Chris

Edited by member 21 Jun 2018 at 14:11  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 21 Jun 2018 at 14:51
Double congratulations then :-)

Chris, very very happy for you - that onco really was the voice of doom, wasn't he. Tawt. I did wonder if they would be able to whip the kidney out while they were on with the aneurysm.

Allan, normal testosterone range is quite high but what they are looking for in a testosterone test while you are on hormones is that you are below or heading towards castrate level. Castrate level is 0.69 so to be down to 0.8 so quickly is really good - confirmation that the decapeptyl is working :-)
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 21 Jun 2018 at 15:25
So pleased you feel relieved, positive and happier. May the force be with you.

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade
User
Posted 21 Jun 2018 at 17:32

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Double congratulations then :-)

Chris, very very happy for you - that onco really was the voice of doom, wasn't he. Tawt. I did wonder if they would be able to whip the kidney out while they were on with the aneurysm.

Allan, normal testosterone range is quite high but what they are looking for in a testosterone test while you are on hormones is that you are below or heading towards castrate level. Castrate level is 0.69 so to be down to 0.8 so quickly is really good - confirmation that the decapeptyl is working :-)


Thanks Lyn, you were correct of course in your advice about my reaction to 8 weeks of hormone therapy would definitely work. My Oncologist was also happy with PSA drop from 38 to6. I was offered HDR Brachytherapy as well as RT, but as the Oncologist said my response to hormone therapy and being T2c confirmed meant 4 weeks RT would suffice. So I decided HDR Brachytherapy was not for me. It was explained well, the reduction in side effects benefit of HDR.


 

User
Posted 22 Jun 2018 at 14:46
I've had a very interesting chat with one of the PCUK nurses today, and I asked her about the "skeletal scan" MRI I had on Wednesday to look for bone mets, because it was something I'd not heard of before, and haven't seen mention of on here, either. She said it's regarded as the "gold standard" for looking for bone mets, and is much more sensitive than the isotopic bone scan that's far more commonly used, and said I was very fortunate to have been offered it. She said that given the fact that it had come back negative, and that both it and all the previous scans had seen no lymph node involvement should make me confident that my cancer is still localised and hence "curable", even though my PSA is quite high at 31.

Feeling significantly happier after speaking to her. All the PCUK nurses are great!

Chris
User
Posted 22 Jun 2018 at 15:33

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I've had a very interesting chat with one of the PCUK nurses today, and I asked her about the "skeletal scan" MRI I had on Wednesday to look for bone mets, because it was something I'd not heard of before, and haven't seen mention of on here, either. She said it's regarded as the "gold standard" for looking for bone mets, and is much more sensitive than the isotopic bone scan that's far more commonly used, and said I was very fortunate to have been offered it. She said that given the fact that it had come back negative, and that both it and all the previous scans had seen no lymph node involvement should make me confident that my cancer is still localised and hence "curable", even though my PSA is quite high at 31.

Feeling significantly happier after speaking to her. All the PCUK nurses are great!

Chris


I 100% Agree with you Chris over the last eight weeks I have spoken twice to the PCUK nurses and at both times the conversations have helped me immensely deal with the situation I’m in. Their empathetic advice and counselling has definitely been invaluable not only with experienced advice, but dispelling rumours and mis information. I think every new addition to this PCa “family” should start off their journey by getting support from these wonderful professionals 

User
Posted 22 Jun 2018 at 17:36

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I've had a very interesting chat with one of the PCUK nurses today, and I asked her about the "skeletal scan" MRI I had on Wednesday to look for bone mets, because it was something I'd not heard of before, and haven't seen mention of on here, either. She said it's regarded as the "gold standard" for looking for bone mets, and is much more sensitive than the isotopic bone scan that's far more commonly used, and said I was very fortunate to have been offered it. She said that given the fact that it had come back negative, and that both it and all the previous scans had seen no lymph node involvement should make me confident that my cancer is still localised and hence "curable", even though my PSA is quite high at 31.

Feeling significantly happier after speaking to her. All the PCUK nurses are great!

Chris


 When I got my Gleason score it included my T rating as well.  That is the results that you are waiting for now Chris for example I was T2c


 And this means although my Gleason total is nine,  it is still totally within the prostate  and I think that is the good indicator that you will be on a curative pathway like me.  The news that you have no mets must be so reassuring for you and after our chat on the phone  and reading some of your comments on here I am so glad you are in such a better place.


 There will be no more news and updates from me on my situation until after my radiotherapy finishes at the end of August but I will be on here regularly to try my best to give some help to new members recently diagnosed 

Edited by member 22 Jun 2018 at 17:37  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 26 Jun 2018 at 09:44
Thanks, Alan. Yes, I'm in an enormously better place mentally now. Although last week was absolutely horrendous I think it's actually been beneficial, in that I'm feeling a lot more accepting now about what I actually do have, which it now seems is almost certainly localised PCa. Even if the template biopsy finds more active cancer than the Gleason 3+3 that's shown up so far, I am, as you say, on a curative pathway that will probably be the same as yours (HT+RT).

Yesterday I had a phone call and a long chat with a very nice lady who's a specialist prostate cancer nurse at the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre on the Wirral (which is where I'll be treated). She will be my point of contact with "the system", which is reassuring, because I wasn't sure that would happen given that I've had everything done privately up until now. At least is reassures me that I'm now officially in the system, and that my treatment will (eventually) start.

This afternoon I visit the nurse at my GP's surgery to have an enormously long list of vaccinations to prepare me for the likely removal of my spleen in a few weeks when I have the splenic artery aneurysm sorted out.

Chris
User
Posted 29 Jun 2018 at 09:03
Got an appointment through for my template biopsy: Monday 23rd July. That should hopefully be the end of my diagnostic journey and I can start treatment soon after, which I'm really looking forward to - feels like an eternity since I was initially diagnosed, although in reality it's only been a little over a month.

I'm going away on a fortnight's holiday tomorrow, and everything really kicks off immediately I get back. Got a pre-op assessment for my kidney/spleen surgery a couple of days after I get back (Monday 16th), the template biopsy the following Monday, and I hope to get the surgery done soon after that.

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jul 2018 at 09:44
An update:

I had a very enjoyable holiday, which did me the world of good. A much needed "change of scene".

This week I've had two pre-operative assessments at different hospitals.

This coming Monday (23rd July) I'm being admitted as a day patient to the Clatterbridge hospital on the Wirral for a template biopsy under general anaesthetic. This will (hopefully!) be the final diagnostic procedure before prostate treatment commences.

The Monday after that (30th July) I'm being admitted to the Countess of Chester hospital (in Chester) for treatment for my splenic artery aneurysm. I'll have a thin tube inserted into the femoral artery in my groin, where it'll be guided to the appropriate place and lots of tiny coils inserted into the aneurysm to block it. I'll then be moved to a ward for overnight observation. If all goes according to plan, I'll go home the next day. If the artery becomes blocked (which there's a significant risk of) I'll go into surgery to have my spleen removed, which obviously will then entail a more extended stay in hospital, so I'm going prepared for the latter eventuality. I'm told that the procedure carries a small risk of stroke or death, but it needs doing, and I guess no operation is without risk, so so be it.

Then in the middle of August I'm due to have the surgery to remove my kidney tumour. The results of the prostate biopsy should also be back by early August, so I would expect to start whatever prostate treatment they decide on around then, too.

So things are moving on. Just keen to get it over and done with now!

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jul 2018 at 15:01

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
An update:

I had a very enjoyable holiday, which did me the world of good. A much needed "change of scene".

This week I've had two pre-operative assessments at different hospitals.

This coming Monday (23rd July) I'm being admitted as a day patient to the Clatterbridge hospital on the Wirral for a template biopsy under general anaesthetic. This will (hopefully!) be the final diagnostic procedure before prostate treatment commences.

The Monday after that (30th July) I'm being admitted to the Countess of Chester hospital (in Chester) for treatment for my splenic artery aneurysm. I'll have a thin tube inserted into the femoral artery in my groin, where it'll be guided to the appropriate place and lots of tiny coils inserted into the aneurysm to block it. I'll then be moved to a ward for overnight observation. If all goes according to plan, I'll go home the next day. If the artery becomes blocked (which there's a significant risk of) I'll go into surgery to have my spleen removed, which obviously will then entail a more extended stay in hospital, so I'm going prepared for the latter eventuality. I'm told that the procedure carries a small risk of stroke or death, but it needs doing, and I guess no operation is without risk, so so be it.

Then in the middle of August I'm due to have the surgery to remove my kidney tumour. The results of the prostate biopsy should also be back by early August, so I would expect to start whatever prostate treatment they decide on around then, too.

So things are moving on. Just keen to get it over and done with now!

Chris


Hi Chris, so glad you had a good holiday and recharged!


Just to say, i got the results of my Template Biopsy in 13 days, hope your NHS can equal that! Good luck for the other ops mate!


Alan

User
Posted 20 Jul 2018 at 16:46

Good luck Chris for the 23rd and 30th of July as well as the August appointment

Edited by member 20 Jul 2018 at 16:46  | Reason: Not specified

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 20 Jul 2018 at 20:30
Thanks, all. Looking forward to getting this last test done and dusted so I can finally start treatment. It feels like an awfully long time since my initial diagnosis!

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jul 2018 at 22:52
Glad that you were able to enjoy the holiday. Good luck with the next bit.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 24 Jul 2018 at 07:11
Had my template biopsy at about midday yesterday. No pain (unlike the earlier TRUS biopsy!), but a couple of hours after the procedure I started having extreme difficulty urinating. If I waited until I was bursting I could pass a small amount of urine, but very uncomfortable. The hospital offered to insert a catheter, but I declined!

Started easing about midnight, and this morning I can manage to urinate reasonably OK but very "start and stop". Hopefully things will return to normal as the bruising in the prostate subsides.

Felt very nauseous as a result of the general anaesthetic, but feel a lot better this morning - just got a very dry mouth.

I'll be seeing the consultant in a fortnight for the results.
User
Posted 25 Jul 2018 at 06:43

Urine flow back to normal again this morning, so that didn’t take too long. I’m very happy I didn’t opt for the catheter, since that would have been in all week.


Just used my phone's camera to look at my perineum and it's one big black bruise - no wonder it's a little tender when I sit down at the moment!


Chris

Edited by member 25 Jul 2018 at 08:15  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Jul 2018 at 08:18

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


Urine flow back to normal again this morning, so that didn’t take too long. I’m very happy I didn’t opt for the catheter, since that would have been in all week.


Just used my phone's camera to look at my perineum and it's one big black bruise - no wonder it's a little tender when I sit down at the moment!


Chris



don't put that shot on Facebook! !!

User
Posted 29 Jul 2018 at 08:15
I go into hospital at 8am tomorrow for the aneurysm procedure, and to be honest, I'm absolutely petrified about it. I know it needs doing - it's a relatively small chance of stroke or death in this procedure against absolutely certain death in a few years if it's not done - but the thought of all the things that could go wrong, and the permanent effect they would have on my life, fills me with dread. This is the procedure which I've been told carries a significant risk of resulting in having to have my spleen removed.

I know I should look at this as the first step on my road to recovery (it's the first "curative" treatment I'll be having since all this was diagnosed) but I can't help being scared about it.

Chris
User
Posted 29 Jul 2018 at 10:29
Good Luck Chris and hope all goes well for you, I’m dreading 21st August when I go in for surgery.
User
Posted 29 Jul 2018 at 10:58

Yes, chin up Chris, you are into the curative pathway now, things can only improve my friend. Always here for a chat, you have my number


 


Alan

 
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