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Vitamin D

User
Posted 01 Nov 2020 at 21:48

Hi!

When my husband was diagnosed, he was also found to have low levels of vitamin D. We heard there is a link between vitamin D and prostate cancer, where low levels seem to very often occur in men with the disease. I can't find many studies which are able to imply a cause or effect, but I wondered how many men here also had low vitamin D levels? 

 

'Sorrow looks back, worry looks around, but faith looks up'
User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 00:02
Approximately 20% of the UK population has low vit D levels, particularly in winter. There is no research to suggest that men with low vit D levels are more at risk but there was some research a few years ago that suggested prostate cancer may be more aggressive in black men with vit d deficiency. Low levels is not the same as deficiency.

As with everything else, a healthy diet and exercise (particularly outdoors) is good for everyone, including men with PCa.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 03:45

The resident doctor in ‘Private Eye’ magazine; ‘MD’, amongst a two-page article about the Covid 19 pandemic, mentions that he thinks everyone should be taking vitamin D supplements.

And also my friend, Lawrence, a retired consultant gynaecologist of thirty years, (what the hell does he know about prostate glands except they cause half the trouble he’s had to deal with?), also recommends vitamin D supplements.

Just off to Holland and Barrett before they’re forced to close!

Cheers, John.

Edited by member 02 Nov 2020 at 19:07  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 06:27

I was diagnosed 4 years ago.  My urologist immediately put me on a daily vitamin D, daily aspirin and daily statin.  I’m still on them

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 08:03

I also had a Vitamin D deficiency at time of diagnosis and have been prescribed Vitamin D and Calcium tablets.

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 08:04

Alison, there's a known correlation between low vitamin D during puberty and prostate cancer in later life. More than one study has shown the link, in some cases by working back from lack of exposure to sunlight during teenage years rather than by having historic vitamin D readings. Professor Tim Oliver presented on this (and some other light hearted correlations that apply during puberty) at last year's Tackle Prostate Cancer conference.

There has been the suggestion many times that this could be a significant contributory factor in black men having a higher incidence of prostate cancer too, but there's been no research on that as a cause.

The causal link between vitamin D during puberty and prostate cancer is not known far as I know.

It's also worth mentioning, for anyone taking vitamin D supplements (and other anti-oxidants) and having radiotherapy, that there is a theoretical conflict, causing some people to suggest avoiding vitamin D during radiotherapy. One way vitamin D operates is to generate enzymes that mop up free radicals, which might otherwise cause DNA corruptions, which is one way to start cancer. Radiotherapy on the other hand works by generating loads of free radicals in order to corrupt DNA, and during that period you don't want to be trying to mop them up.

Edited by member 02 Nov 2020 at 08:19  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 22:10
Vitamin D levels have been claimed to be linked to quite a lot of diseases over the last few years, including Covid-19 most recently. In most cases the data is one of correlation rather than proof of direct cause. However given that in the UK our exposure to sunlight (which is what the body needs to make its own vitamin D) is sub-optimal, it is generally thought that it is worthwhile supplementing our diet. As mentioned above, the problem is greater for those with genetically dark skin where the pigment reduces the amount of sunlight reaching the vitamin D synthesising cells.

I don't think there is any evidence that levels higher than the recommended daily amount have any benefit. I found that many of the over-the-counter tablets have more than that and are relatively expensive; I ended up buying Tesco multi-vitamins as a cost-effective source (other shops are available).

User
Posted 03 Nov 2020 at 16:55

I had borderline low vitamin D levels in winter for some years. I’ve put myself on a modest 1000IU daily dose initially as data is also emerging ref Covid-19 hospitalisation rate and apparent low vit D level (proper study needed to eliminate cause and effect etc). 

After a month will back this off to ~500IU daily.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-d/

User
Posted 04 Nov 2020 at 06:31
I am also on Vit D now but only recently so, so am unable to connect it to my PCa diagnosis back in 2007. My dental implantologist could not understand why one of my implants had failed and Vit D was one of the things he wanted analysed in a blood test. My GP authorised the test and subsequently started me on Vit D tablets due to the deficiency it showed.
Barry
User
Posted 04 Nov 2020 at 08:35

Here is an interesting link: https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/prostate-cancer/by-country/male

When I spoke to the prof ref PCa risks he mentioned saturated fats are under the spotlight in terms of research.

Asian nations appear to have a lower incident rate which I suspect might be influenced by diet. 

The general advice appears to be eat a varied diet high in fruit and vegetables and low in saturated fats.

My diet has always been pretty good so I’m thinking genetic factors are at play in my case. This was backed up by my ex who is an immunologist and cancer researcher. Her view was that genetics play a high role in cancer...perhaps as much at 60-70% then the rest is a mixup of lifestyle and diet.

User
Posted 04 Nov 2020 at 14:46
I have been on Vit. D supplements for many ( 30 ish) years, I still developed Pca. Maybe my Pca was less aggressive as a result? Who knows, As a bonus I have not got any arthritis at all and I am 77 yrs old!

Gleason 6 = 3+3 PSA 8.8 P. volume 48 cc Left Cores 3/3, Volume = 20% PSA 10.8 Feb '19 PSA 1.2

Jan '20 PSA 0.3 July '20 0.1 Jan. 21 < 0.1

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User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 00:02
Approximately 20% of the UK population has low vit D levels, particularly in winter. There is no research to suggest that men with low vit D levels are more at risk but there was some research a few years ago that suggested prostate cancer may be more aggressive in black men with vit d deficiency. Low levels is not the same as deficiency.

As with everything else, a healthy diet and exercise (particularly outdoors) is good for everyone, including men with PCa.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 03:45

The resident doctor in ‘Private Eye’ magazine; ‘MD’, amongst a two-page article about the Covid 19 pandemic, mentions that he thinks everyone should be taking vitamin D supplements.

And also my friend, Lawrence, a retired consultant gynaecologist of thirty years, (what the hell does he know about prostate glands except they cause half the trouble he’s had to deal with?), also recommends vitamin D supplements.

Just off to Holland and Barrett before they’re forced to close!

Cheers, John.

Edited by member 02 Nov 2020 at 19:07  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 06:27

I was diagnosed 4 years ago.  My urologist immediately put me on a daily vitamin D, daily aspirin and daily statin.  I’m still on them

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 08:03

I also had a Vitamin D deficiency at time of diagnosis and have been prescribed Vitamin D and Calcium tablets.

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 08:04

Alison, there's a known correlation between low vitamin D during puberty and prostate cancer in later life. More than one study has shown the link, in some cases by working back from lack of exposure to sunlight during teenage years rather than by having historic vitamin D readings. Professor Tim Oliver presented on this (and some other light hearted correlations that apply during puberty) at last year's Tackle Prostate Cancer conference.

There has been the suggestion many times that this could be a significant contributory factor in black men having a higher incidence of prostate cancer too, but there's been no research on that as a cause.

The causal link between vitamin D during puberty and prostate cancer is not known far as I know.

It's also worth mentioning, for anyone taking vitamin D supplements (and other anti-oxidants) and having radiotherapy, that there is a theoretical conflict, causing some people to suggest avoiding vitamin D during radiotherapy. One way vitamin D operates is to generate enzymes that mop up free radicals, which might otherwise cause DNA corruptions, which is one way to start cancer. Radiotherapy on the other hand works by generating loads of free radicals in order to corrupt DNA, and during that period you don't want to be trying to mop them up.

Edited by member 02 Nov 2020 at 08:19  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 02 Nov 2020 at 22:10
Vitamin D levels have been claimed to be linked to quite a lot of diseases over the last few years, including Covid-19 most recently. In most cases the data is one of correlation rather than proof of direct cause. However given that in the UK our exposure to sunlight (which is what the body needs to make its own vitamin D) is sub-optimal, it is generally thought that it is worthwhile supplementing our diet. As mentioned above, the problem is greater for those with genetically dark skin where the pigment reduces the amount of sunlight reaching the vitamin D synthesising cells.

I don't think there is any evidence that levels higher than the recommended daily amount have any benefit. I found that many of the over-the-counter tablets have more than that and are relatively expensive; I ended up buying Tesco multi-vitamins as a cost-effective source (other shops are available).

User
Posted 03 Nov 2020 at 16:55

I had borderline low vitamin D levels in winter for some years. I’ve put myself on a modest 1000IU daily dose initially as data is also emerging ref Covid-19 hospitalisation rate and apparent low vit D level (proper study needed to eliminate cause and effect etc). 

After a month will back this off to ~500IU daily.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-d/

User
Posted 04 Nov 2020 at 06:31
I am also on Vit D now but only recently so, so am unable to connect it to my PCa diagnosis back in 2007. My dental implantologist could not understand why one of my implants had failed and Vit D was one of the things he wanted analysed in a blood test. My GP authorised the test and subsequently started me on Vit D tablets due to the deficiency it showed.
Barry
User
Posted 04 Nov 2020 at 08:35

Here is an interesting link: https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/prostate-cancer/by-country/male

When I spoke to the prof ref PCa risks he mentioned saturated fats are under the spotlight in terms of research.

Asian nations appear to have a lower incident rate which I suspect might be influenced by diet. 

The general advice appears to be eat a varied diet high in fruit and vegetables and low in saturated fats.

My diet has always been pretty good so I’m thinking genetic factors are at play in my case. This was backed up by my ex who is an immunologist and cancer researcher. Her view was that genetics play a high role in cancer...perhaps as much at 60-70% then the rest is a mixup of lifestyle and diet.

User
Posted 04 Nov 2020 at 14:46
I have been on Vit. D supplements for many ( 30 ish) years, I still developed Pca. Maybe my Pca was less aggressive as a result? Who knows, As a bonus I have not got any arthritis at all and I am 77 yrs old!

Gleason 6 = 3+3 PSA 8.8 P. volume 48 cc Left Cores 3/3, Volume = 20% PSA 10.8 Feb '19 PSA 1.2

Jan '20 PSA 0.3 July '20 0.1 Jan. 21 < 0.1

 
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